Skip to main content

Volume 6 Supplement 2

Selected articles from the Second Annual Translational Bioinformatics Conference (TBC 2012)

Research

Edited by Ju Han Kim, Maricel Kann and Jessica Tenenbaum

Publication of this supplement has not been supported by any external sponsorship. Information about the funding for publication costs can be found in the Declarations section of each article.

Second Annual Translational Bioinformatics Conference (TBC 2012). Go to conference site.

Jeju Island, Korea13-16 October 2012

  1. High-throughput (HT) RNA interference (RNAi) screens are increasingly used for reverse genetics and drug discovery. These experiments are laborious and costly, hence sample sizes are often very small. Powerful...

    Authors: Mark A van de Wiel, Renée X de Menezes, Ellen Siebring-van Olst and Victor W van Beusechem

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S1

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  2. Genes do not act in isolation but instead as part of complex regulatory networks. To understand how breast tumors adapt to the presence of the drug letrozole, at the molecular level, it is necessary to conside...

    Authors: Nadia M Penrod and Jason H Moore

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S2

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  3. Using annotations to the articles in MEDLINE®/PubMed®, over six thousand chemical compounds with pharmacological actions have been tracked since 1996. Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs...

    Authors: Warren A Cheung, BF Francis Ouellette and Wyeth W Wasserman

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S3

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  4. Gene expression-based prostate cancer gene signatures of poor prognosis are hampered by lack of gene feature reproducibility and a lack of understandability of their function. Molecular pathway-level mechanism...

    Authors: James L Chen, Alexander Hsu, Xinan Yang, Jianrong Li, Younghee Lee, Gurunadh Parinandi, Haiquan Li and Yves A Lussier

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S4

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  5. It was previously reported that an association analysis based on haplotype clusters increased power over single-locus tests, and that another association test based on diplotype trend regression analysis outpe...

    Authors: Sunshin Kim, KyungChae Park, Chol Shin, Nam H Cho, Jeong-Jae Ko, InSong Koh and KyuBum Kwack

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S5

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  6. With the recent decreasing cost of genome sequence data, there has been increasing interest in rare variants and methods to detect their association to disease. We developed BioBin, a flexible collapsing metho...

    Authors: Carrie B Moore, John R Wallace, Alex T Frase, Sarah A Pendergrass and Marylyn D Ritchie

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S6

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  7. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease and harmful to human health, and most of the existing biomarkers are mainly to measure the disease phenotype after the disease onset (or drastic deterioration). Until...

    Authors: Xiaoping Liu, Rui Liu, Xing-Ming Zhao and Luonan Chen

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S8

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  8. Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is characterized by thickening and/or tightness of the unilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM), ending up with torticollis. Our aim was to identify differentially expr...

    Authors: Shin-Young Yim, Dukyong Yoon, Myong Chul Park, Il Jae Lee, Jang-Hee Kim, Myung Ae Lee, Kyu-Sung Kwack, Jan-Dee Lee, Jeong-Hun Lee, Euy-Young Soh, Young-In Na, Rae Woong Park, KiYoung Lee and Jae-Bum Jun

    Citation: BMC Medical Genomics 2013 6(Suppl 2):S10

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

2019 Journal Metrics

Announcement

As a result of the significant disruption that is being caused by the COVID-19 pandemic we are very aware that many researchers will have difficulty in meeting the timelines associated with our peer review process during normal times.  Please do let us know if you need additional time. Our systems will continue to remind you of the original timelines but we intend to be highly flexible at this time.